Checklist – Steps One, Two, Three

This workshop goes back to basics and looks at the first three steps. It’s great for newcomers and a reminder to other members about the keeping the first three steps simple when carrying the message.

The checklists presented in the workshop are below or download as a pdf:

1. Signs that I don’t drink normally, that I get a craving for more.

  • Getting drunk when I don’t intend to.
  • Drinking more than the people around me.
  • Unable to leave a glass with some still left in it.
  • Once I start drinking, worrying there won’t be enough.
  • Drinking faster than those around me.
  • Last to leave the pub or party.
  • Drinking more when I get home after being out drinking.
  • Promising not to drink too much but getting drunk anyway.
  • Feeling panicky if the grog runs out.
  • Spending all the money I have on alcohol.
  • Worrying about where to find/buy more alcohol.
  • Forgetting to eat while drinking.
  • Continuing to drink after throwing up.
  • Continuing to drink and missing the last bus/train/tram home.
  • Missing an important event because I’m drunk.
  • Forgetting about other commitments after starting to drink.
  • Using any possible means to open a bottle without a corkscrew.
  • Drinking an expensive bottle that was kept aside for a special occasion.
  • Trying to drink spilled alcohol.
  • Drinking other people’s dregs.
  • Stealing other people’s drinks.
  • Borrowing money or using up all my credit to buy more alcohol.
  • Begging for money to buy more alcohol.
  • Flirting with someone to get them to buy me a drink.
  • Doing something immoral, illegal or dangerous to get more alcohol.
  • Not caring about anything else apart from drinking.
  • Having to keep a large stash of grog.
  • Leaving young kids alone to go and get more grog.
  • Driving drunk to get more.
  • Drinking things that are not meant to be drunk (metho, perfume).
  • Drinking to blackout.
  • Drinking until I pass out.

2. Signs I knew my drinking was abnormal and didn’t want others to know.

  • Not drinking when I know there won’t be enough.
  • Not drinking when I know my drinking will look out of place.
  • Not going to places/functions where I’ll have to restrict my drinking.
  • Not going in shouts because other people don’t drink fast enough.
  • Secretly sneaking extra drinks.
  • Eating mints or lozenges to conceal the smell.
  • Drinking from coffee cups to hide the fact that it’s alcohol.
  • Having a hidden stash of grog.
  • Fearing that others will notice how much I’m drinking.
  • Offering to go to the bar to get the drinks so I can get an extra one.
  • Fortifying my drinks (adding vodka to beer) so no one will know.
  • Drinking at sleazy bars where my drinking won’t be questioned.
  • Lying about where I’ve been and what I’ve been doing.
  • Lying about how much I’ve drunk.
  • Denying that I’ve been drinking.
  • Using excuses (real or imagined) to drink.
  • Hiding bottles.
  • Hiding empties.
  • Making excuses to go to the supermarket when really I’m after more grog.
  • Creating an argument so I can leave to go and drink.
  • Putting empties in the neighbour’s bin.
  • Shopping at different bottle shops to hide the amount I’m drinking.
  • Making up stories to tell the shop assistant about why I buy so much grog.
  • Justifying my excessive drinking.
  • Blaming other people for my drinking.
  • Telling myself I could stop if I wanted.
  • Telling a sob story to justify my drinking.
  • Acting ‘offended’ if someone questions my drinking.
  • Lying to myself about how much I drink.
  • Feeling guilt and remorse about my drinking.
  • Drinking alone.
  • Making promises to stop.

3. Signs that I’ve lost the choice in drinking, that I’m powerless over alcohol.

  • Promising to have an alcohol free day but drinking anyway.
  • Promising to only drink on weekends but failing.
  • Resolving not to drink until a particular date but failing.
  • Promising to give up ’tomorrow’ but never doing it.
  • Walking/driving into the pub/bottle shop without thinking (on ‘autopilot’).
  • Picking up a drink to celebrate a period of sobriety.
  • Drinking on medications which shouldn’t be mixed with alcohol.
  • Drinking when told not to by a doctor/health professional.
  • Drinking while pregnant.
  • Thinking – “this time will be different”.
  • Promising not to have a drink but giving in to “just one”.
  • Using excuses to drink.
  • Inventing excuses to drink.
  • Losing the argument with myself about whether to drink or not.
  • Drinking for no reason.
  • Deciding to quit and going on a binge in preparation.
  • Continuing to drink despite threats of job loss.
  • Continuing to drink knowing it will lead to marriage breakdown.
  • Continuing to drink despite the threat of financial ruin.
  • Drinking knowing it will re-trigger a serious health problem.
  • Continuing to drink knowing I am hurting my loved ones.
  • Continuing to drink knowing my children will be taken away.
  • Continuing to drink knowing it is killing me.
  • Going into rehab multiple times.
  • Coming straight out of hospital/detox and drinking.
  • Forgetting about the consequences of drinking.
  • Relapsing when I’m happy.
  • Forgetting the suffering drinking caused me and the people around me.
  • Picking up a drink even though I know life is better without it.
  • Seeking help by going to AA.
  • Relapsing after making a commitment to AA and sobriety.
  • Drinking again with the full knowledge of my alcoholic condition.

4. Signs that I’ve found hope in Alcoholics Anonymous.

  • Coming to a second AA meeting.
  • Being inspired by AA members.
  • Feeling better after a meeting.
  • Noticing the benefits of not drinking.
  • Feeling uplifted by AA.
  • Getting honest with myself.
  • Committing to regular meetings.
  • Reading the Big Book.
  • Being open to suggestions heard in AA.
  • Committing to 30 in 30 / 60 in 60 / 90 in 90.
  • Helping out at meetings.
  • Joining a home group.
  • Encouraging other newcomers.
  • Getting a sponsor.
  • Enjoying seeing other people recover.
  • Trying to be honest with others.
  • Feeling hopeful.
  • Believing recovery is possible.
  • Returning to AA after a lapse.
  • Laughing with other alcoholics.
  • Appreciating the wisdom heard in the rooms.
  • Sharing my story.
  • Laughing at the ridiculous things we thought while drinking.
  • Referring to drinking as something I did in the past.
  • Looking forward to a better, sober life.
  • Trying to have an open mind.
  • Putting aside prejudice about spiritual ideas.
  • Contemplating my own spiritual values.
  • Thinking about my own conception of a power greater than me.
  • Letting go of old ideas.
  • Coming to believe in a power greater than myself.
  • Making a commitment to a spiritual life (Step Three).